A few hidden treasures of Ankara

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Before coming to Ankara, I was warned that it was not the most exciting city of Turkey. Leaving hesitations aside, I decided to spent two months in this city and I was pleasantly surprised by the rich history and fun times that this old city has to offer. This post will be about my adventures throughout the nooks and cranies of this city.

Old ankara homes, ulus

Old ankara homes, ulus

Old ankara homes, ulus

Old ankara homes, ulus

Hamamönü

Paper marbling at Hamamönü. The older woman invited young girls from the audience to teach them this art form.

I took this at Hamamönü, the restored area of old Ankara with tons of traditional shops, cafes, shisha bars, etc. The place was buzzing with activity post Iftar dinner

I took this at Hamamönü, the restored area of old Ankara with tons of traditional shops, cafes, shisha bars, etc. The place was buzzing with activity post Iftar dinner

Koceteppe Mosque – this is the largest mosque in Ankara.  After iftar dinner, my friend took me inside (we had to split because he couldn’t enter into the women’s section, and vice versa), and I walked throughout the mosque, snapping photos. The typical Islamic artwork inside the mosque was beautiful, and people were so welcoming of me, the one foreigner/only Asian/only girl in a super bright headscarf that my guy friend awkwardly tied around my head.

Koceteppe Mosque – this is the largest mosque in Ankara. After iftar dinner, my friend took me inside (we had to split because he couldn’t enter into the women’s section, and vice versa), and I walked throughout the mosque, snapping photos. The typical Islamic artwork inside the mosque was beautiful, and people were so welcoming of me, the one foreigner/only Asian/only girl in a super bright headscarf that my guy friend awkwardly tied around my head.

Again, inside the mosque from the women's section. I tried my best to hide behind my (very tall male) friend while walking around this men-only section of the mosque while the imam was speaking. Men glared at me, so I hurried out of there!

Again, inside the mosque from the women’s section. I tried my best to hide behind my (very tall male) friend while walking around this men-only section of the mosque while the imam was speaking. Men glared at me, so I hurried out of there!

I took this photo of the Qur’ans because it reminded me of Bibles that are available in churches for public use

I snapped this photo from the inside of the mosque in an area where only women are allowed.

I snapped this photo from the inside of the mosque in an area where only women are allowed.

Inside the Koceteppe Mosque

Inside the Koceteppe Mosque

Hacı Bayram Mosque, This mosque, in the Ulus quarter next to the Temple of Augustus, was built in the early 15th century in Seljuk style by an unknown architect.  The ladies that I met inside the mosque were so welcoming! Without speaking a word of English, old women gathered around me, kissed me, redid my headscarf that my friend awkwardly tied around my head, and took my by the hand to show me around the inside of this old mosque.

Hacı Bayram Mosque,
This mosque, in the Ulus quarter next to the Temple of Augustus, was built in the early 15th century in Seljuk style by an unknown architect.
The ladies that I met inside the mosque were so welcoming! Without speaking a word of English, old women gathered around me, kissed me, redid my headscarf that my friend awkwardly tied around my head, and took my by the hand to show me around the inside of this old mosque.

The Korean War Memorial to honor the Turkish soldiers who served in the war.

The Korean War Memorial to honor the Turkish soldiers who served in the war.

The front of the Ethnography Museum, with an Ataturk statue

The front of the Ethnography Museum, with an Ataturk statue

Mustafa Kemel Ataturk's  body was mummified after he died. The body was was taken from this place to   Anıtkabir on 10/11/1953

Mustafa Kemel Ataturk’s body was mummified after he died. The body was was taken from this place to Anıtkabir on 10/11/1953

Hat art on ceramic at the Ethnography Museum

Hat art on ceramic at the Ethnography Museum

Traditional tea culture display

Traditional tea culture display

A çaydanlık at Göksu parkı, eryaman, Ankara

A çaydanlık at Göksu parkı, eryaman, Ankara

Me and Mustafa Kemal Atatürk!

Me and Mustafa Kemal Atatürk!

Where the old Turkish Parliament sat. I believe there were about 160 seats in this convening room.

Where the old Turkish Parliament sat. I believe there were about 160 seats in this convening room.

"Sovereignty unconditionally belongs to the Nation"  is the founding principle of the Republic of Turkey. This is the second Parliament Building of the Republic of Turkey

“Sovereignty unconditionally belongs to the Nation” is the founding principle of the Republic of Turkey. This is the second Parliament Building of the Republic of Turkey

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